Day of Pentecost

A blessed Pentecost, friends! May you know the power of the risen and reigning Christ resting on you and working through you today, tomorrow, and always! 


Look: Anatomy of A Flame, Chemical Atlas - Flame


Listen: “The Source” from There’s A Light, Liz Vice

Spotify | YouTube | Lyrics

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Pentecost 2019. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


Now the whole earth had one language and the same words. And as people migrated from the east, they found a plain in the land of Shinar and settled there. And they said to one another, “Come, let us make bricks, and burn them thoroughly.” And they had brick for stone, and bitumen for mortar. Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower with its top in the heavens, and let us make a name for ourselves, lest we be dispersed over the face of the whole earth.” And the Lord came down to see the city and the tower, which the children of man had built. And the Lord said, “Behold, they are one people, and they have all one language, and this is only the beginning of what they will do. And nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and there confuse their language, so that they may not understand one another’s speech.” So the Lord dispersed them from there over the face of all the earth, and they left off building the city. Therefore its name was called Babel, because there the Lord confused the language of all the earth. And from there the Lord dispersed them over the face of all the earth.”

*

”These all look to you,
to give them their food in due season.
When you give it to them, they gather it up;
when you open your hand, they are filled with good things.
When you hide your face, they are dismayed;
when you take away their breath, they die
and return to their dust.
When you send forth your Spirit, they are created,
and you renew the face of the ground.”

*

”For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’”

*

”And divided tongues as of fire appeared to them and rested on each one of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance.

But Peter, standing with the eleven, lifted up his voice and addressed them: “Men of Judea and all who dwell in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and give ear to my words. For these people are not drunk, as you suppose, since it is only the third hour of the day. But this is what was uttered through the prophet Joel:

“‘And in the last days it shall be, God declares,
that I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh,
and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
and your young men shall see visions,
and your old men shall dream dreams;
even on my male servants and female servants
in those days I will pour out my Spirit, and they shall prophesy.
And I will show wonders in the heavens above
and signs on the earth below,
blood, and fire, and vapor of smoke;
the sun shall be turned to darkness
and the moon to blood,
before the day of the Lord comes, the great and magnificent day.
And it shall come to pass that everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.’
— Genesis 11:1-9 * Psalm 104:27-30 * Romans 8:14-15 * Acts 2:3-4, 14-21 (ESV)

Pray:

Almighty God, on this day you opened the way of eternal life to every race and nation by the promised gift of your Holy Spirit: Shed abroad this gift throughout the world by the preaching of the Gospel, that it may reach to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for The Day of Pentecost: Whitsunday

Do:

Enjoy a campfire this evening.

How to: Start a campfire with one match

Enjoy a campfire this evening and take a moment to read Malcolm Guite's sonnet for Pentecost:

Pentecost

Today we feel the wind beneath our wings
Today  the hidden fountain flows and plays
Today the church draws breath at last and sings
As every flame becomes a Tongue of praise.
This is the feast of fire,air, and water
Poured out and breathed and kindled into earth.
The earth herself awakens to her maker
And is translated out of death to birth.
The right words come today in their right order
And every word spells freedom and release
Today the gospel crosses every border
All tongues are loosened by the Prince of Peace
Today the lost are found in His translation.
Whose mother-tongue is Love, in  every nation.


See Pentecost posts from previous years here.

Fourth Sunday of Eastertide: Good Shepherd

The celebration continues with the Great Fifty Days called Eastertide. I hope you’re enjoying the Practice Resurrection series that began this past week. Hallelujah! Christ is risen!


Look: The Shepherd of Sandtown, Stephen Towns


Listen: “The Lord Is My Shepherd (Psalm 23)” on The North Coast Sessions, Keith & Kristyn Getty

Spotify | YouTube | Lyrics

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Resurrection 2019. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


Read:

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He makes me lie down in green pastures.
He leads me beside still waters.
He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil,
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me
in the presence of my enemies;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
all the days of my life,
and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
forever.

*

”Jesus answered them, “I told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in my Father’s name bear witness about me, but you do not believe because you are not among my sheep. My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand. I and the Father are one.
— Psalm 23 * John 10:25-30 (ESV)

Sunday: Acts 9:36-43; Psalm 23; Revelation 7:9-1; John 10:22-30

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer. This week’s readings include the Book of Wisdom from the Apocrypha so I’ve linked to the RSV. Here’s a helpful commentary If you’re wondering if Anglicans (or other Protestants) read the Apocrypha.


Pray:

O God, whose Son Jesus is the good shepherd of your people; Grant that when we hear his voice we may know him who calls us each by name, and follow where he leads; who, with you and the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for Fourth Sunday in Eastertide

Do:

In previous years, we've celebrated the Great 50 Days between Easter Sunday and Pentecost Sunday (aka, Eastertide) with a series I've dubbed Practice Resurrection (after the Wendell Berry poem). It's one of my favorite series all year, and I'm excited to start again. I need your photos and captions to make it work. To help prime the pump, I thought you might enjoy the list of ideas I brainstormed for simple ways to practice resurrection.

Choose 1 idea or 50, but whatever you do, do it with gusto!

Here's how you can share your photo stories with me for the blog:

1. Add something to your day that helps you practice resurrection (one day or fifty days -doesn't matter).

2. Take a picture and write a description in 1-50 words. 

3. Share it with me via email, share on my Facebook page, or tag me on Instagram (you can tag me with @a_sacramental_life or use the #PracticeResurrection2019 hashtag.) 

I look forward to hearing from you!


(See all Eastertide posts from 2018 here.)

Epiphany + 8: Transfiguration Sunday

A weekly Epiphany devotional post for these 8 weeks of witness. Join us!

You can read here for a brief description of the liturgical season of Epiphany, and see previous Epiphany daybook 2019 posts here. Blessed Epiphany, friends!


Look: Iesu transfigurato (Mark 9:4f), 1964, Salvador Dali


Listen: “Phos Hilaron” from Gladdening Light, Imago Dei Music feat. Hannah Glavor

Spotify | YouTube | Lyrics

Phos Hilaron (Ancient Greek: Φῶς Ἱλαρόν, translit. Fόs Ilarόn) is an ancient Christian hymn originally written in Koine Greek. Often referred to by its Latin title Lumen Hilare, it has been translated into English as O Gladsome Light. It is the earliest known Christian hymn recorded outside of the Bible that is still in use today. The hymn is part of vespers in the Byzantine Rite, and also included in some modern Anglican and Lutheran liturgies.”

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Epiphany - Glory. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


When Moses came down from Mount Sinai, with the two tablets of the testimony in his hand as he came down from the mountain, Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God. Aaron and all the people of Israel saw Moses, and behold, the skin of his face shone, and they were afraid to come near him. But Moses called to them, and Aaron and all the leaders of the congregation returned to him, and Moses talked with them.”

*

”The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble!
He sits enthroned upon the cherubim; let the earth quake!
The Lord is great in Zion;
he is exalted over all the peoples.
Let them praise your great and awesome name!
Holy is he!
The King in his might loves justice.
You have established equity;
you have executed justice
and righteousness in Jacob.
Exalt the Lord our God;
worship at his footstool!
Holy is he!”

*

”Since we have such a hope, we are very bold, not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face so that the Israelites might not gaze at the outcome of what was being brought to an end. But their minds were hardened. For to this day, when they read the old covenant, that same veil remains unlifted, because only through Christ is it taken away. Yes, to this day whenever Moses is read a veil lies over their hearts. But when one turns to the Lord, the veil is removed. Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.”

*

”he took with him Peter and John and James and went up on the mountain to pray. And as he was praying, the appearance of his face was altered, and his clothing became dazzling white. And behold, two men were talking with him, Moses and Elijah, who appeared in glory and spoke of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. Now Peter and those who were with him were heavy with sleep, but when they became fully awake they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him. And as the men were parting from him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah”—not knowing what he said. As he was saying these things, a cloud came and overshadowed them, and they were afraid as they entered the cloud. And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, “This is my Son, my Chosen One; listen to him!” And when the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silent and told no one in those days anything of what they had seen.
— Exodus 34:29-31 * Psalm 99:1-5 * 2 Corinthians 3:12-17 * Luke 9:28-36 (ESV)

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer.


Pray:

O God, who before the passion of your only-begotten Son revealed his glory upon the holy mountain: Grant to us that we, beholding by faith the light of his countenance, may be strengthened to bear our cross, and be changed into his likeness from glory to glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for Last Sunday after the Epiphany

Do:

Prepare for Lent

Lent begins this week on Ash Wednesday, March 6.

First things first: Lent is mostly about recognizing God’s heart for us and the gaps between what we understand about His heart and what we actually receive. You may or may not need any additional resources beyond meeting regularly with your church for worship.

Our favorite Lent devotionals and online resources: If it’s helpful for your daily practice to have a devotional book or meditative prompts, the rest of this post is loaded with ideas.

If you’re new to Lent, here's a simple introduction.

I’m someone who relishes the “community” of the written word, art, and other resources. I’m also just as likely to avoid God’s heart for me by losing myself in a pile of devotional resources. You might decide that this year you need one Psalm and a good hiking trail or empty journal or small group of trusted friends to consider God’s heart together. You might only need a Scripture verse to meditate through the 40 days (plus 6 blessed Sundays!) of Lent, a special candle and bouquet of flowers to catch your attention each morning.

If you decide you’d like some companions for your Lenten journey, each day of Lent (March 6 - April 20) I’ll once again be publishing a devotional post. The Lent Daybook posts leading up to Holy Week will include a work of art, song, daily Scripture passages, a short prayer, and a simple activity to help you practice the prayerful days of Lent. During Holy Week, I’ll publish the seventh annual series, Retrieve Lament.

If you don’t already receive posts from A Sacramental Life in your email inbox, Lent is a good time to start!

No matter how you choose to practice Lent, know you are deeply held in God’s heart and He is most interested in the space you’ll make for Him to share himself with you.


(See all Epiphany Daybook posts from 2018 here.)

Epiphany +7: Forgive

A weekly Epiphany devotional post for these 8 weeks of witness. Join us!

You can read here for a brief description of the liturgical season of Epiphany, and see previous Epiphany daybook 2019 posts here. Blessed Epiphany, friends!

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


Look: Forgive Thy Brother, Scott Erickson

( Source )

I was introduced to this painting at a key moment in my life. Meditating on this image changed me. It gave me eyes to see the beauty of forgiveness even when the one responsible for the wounding seemed reluctant to participate in reconciliation.

The power of this image for me is that I can see myself in both places. The one with the arrows in his back and the one with the bow. I hope you’ll find some truth, goodness, and beauty in the image today as you reflect on Jesus’ weighty words on the meaning of forgiveness and Joseph’s encounter with his brothers.

One more note*. Because I know so many who’ve experienced trauma, and because of my own experience of trauma, I always feel it’s important to say that there are various ways and timelines of offering forgiveness. Please feel free to view this image as something that takes place in the heart, and not always a literal physical interaction. There are those who we may never see again in person because they are no longer here or because they’re not whole enough to be trusted with our physical presence. I believe the power of releasing someone into the hands of God’s righteous judgement frees us to love with or without a personal interaction.

*I share much of what I’ve learned about forgiveness for those who’ve experienced trauma at this post: Feast On Forgiveness.


Listen: “Words to Build A Life On” from Songs from Jacob’s Well, Mike Crawford and His Secret Siblings (Lyrics)

Spotify | YouTube

I don’t usually print the song lyrics, but this song is worth paying attention to every word. Like the painting above, this song came into my life at a critical moment when I needed eyes to see the blessing in what felt like a curse. You can read more about that time here: Lucky.

Words To Build A Life On

by Mike Crawford

These are words to build a life on
These are Your words how can they be mine
These are words to build a life on
These are Your words I want them to be mine

Blessed are the poor
Blessed are the weak
Blessed are the ones
Who can barely speak

Blessed in your hurt
Blessed in your pain
Blessed when your teardrops
Are falling down like rain

Blessed when you’re broken
Blessed when you’re blind
Blessed when you’re fragile
When you have lost your mind

Blessed when you’re desperate
Blessed when you’re scared
Blessed when you’re lonely
Blessed when you’ve failed

Blessed when you’re beat up
Blessed when you’re bruised
Blessed when you’re tore down
Blessed when you’re used

These are words to build a life on
These are Your words how can they be mine
These are words to build a life on
These are Your words I want them to be mine

Blessed when you’re heartbroke
Blessed when you’re fired
Blessed when you’re choked up
Blessed when you’re tired

Blessed when the plans
That you so carefully laid
End up in the junkyard
With all the trash you made

Blessed when you feel like
Giving up the ghost
Blessed when your loved ones
Are the ones who hurt you most

Blessed when you lose your
Own identity
Then blessed when you find it
And it has been redeemed

Blessed when you see what
Your friends can never be
Blessed with your eyes closed
Then Blessed you see Me

These are words to build a life on
These are Your words how can they be mine
These are words to build a life on
These are Your words I want them to be mine

Blessed when you’re hungry
Blessed when you thirst
Cause that’s when you will eat of
The bread that matters most

Blessed when you’re put down
Because of me you’re dissed
Because of me you’re kicked out
They take you off their list

You know you’re on the mark
You know you’ve got it right
You are to be my salt
You are to be my light

So bring out all the flavour
In the feast of this My world
And light up all the colours
Let the banners be unfurled

Shout it from the rooftops
Let the trumpets ring
Sing your freaking lungs out
Tell them Jesus Christ is King!

Jesus is my Saviour
Jesus is divine
Jesus is my answer
Jesus is my life

These are words to build a life on
These are Your words how can they be mine
These are words to build a life on
These are Your words I want them to be mine

Give us ears that we may hear them
voice that we may sing them
life that we may live them
hope that we may give them
hearts that we can feel them
eyes that we can see them
thoughts that we may think them
tongues that we may speak Your words

Your words
These are Your words
I want them to be mine
Be mine
Be mine

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Epiphany - Beatitudes. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


And Joseph said to his brothers, “I am Joseph! Is my father still alive?” But his brothers could not answer him, for they were dismayed at his presence.

So Joseph said to his brothers, “Come near to me, please.” And they came near. And he said, “I am your brother, Joseph, whom you sold into Egypt. And now do not be distressed or angry with yourselves because you sold me here, for God sent me before you to preserve life.

And he kissed all his brothers and wept upon them. After that his brothers talked with him.”

*

”Fret not yourself because of evildoers;
be not envious of wrongdoers!
For they will soon fade like the grass
and wither like the green herb.

Trust in the Lord, and do good;
dwell in the land and befriend faithfulness.
Delight yourself in the Lord,
and he will give you the desires of your heart.

Commit your way to the Lord;
trust in him, and he will act.
He will bring forth your righteousness as the light,
and your justice as the noonday.”

*

”So is it with the resurrection of the dead. What is sown is perishable; what is raised is imperishable. It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it is raised in power. It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body.

Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.”

*

”‘Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.’
— Genesis 45:3-5, 15 * Psalm 37:1-6 * 1 Corinthians 15:42-44, 49 * Luke 6:37-38 (ESV)

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer.


Pray:

O Lord, you have taught us that without love whatever we do is worth nothing; Send your Holy Spirit and pour into our hearts your greatest gift, which is love, the true bond of peace and of all virtue, without which whoever lives is accounted dead before you. Grant this for the sake of your only Son Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for Seventh Sunday After Epiphany

Do:

Forgive thy other

(another image from Scott Erickson)

While all of us need daily reminders to let others off the hook for the ways they’ve hurt, belittled, dismissed, and offended us (see: the Lord’s Prayer), a majority of us are also dealing with experiences of deep wounding from abuse, neglect, and rejection. As I've journeyed these past fourteen years or so with men and women seeking healing for their relationships, and as I've walked my own bumpy path learning to give and receive good love, I've discovered four major roadblocks to forgiveness. I offer them for you to consider, gently and patiently with yourself (and others):

  1. We believe surrendering to forgiveness equals ignoring wrongdoing.

  2. We've become so familiar with the energy anger and bitterness give us, we're afraid we'll no longer recognize ourselves if we release our wounders.

  3. We convince ourselves that we aren't really hurt and, therefore, do not need to forgive.

  4. We already prayed to forgive our offender once and that was enough/it didn't work.

When we feast on unforgiveness, we are never satisfied. There is no justice available to remove the anguish of our wounded selves. When we feast on the Bread of Life, we release ourselves (and our offenders) to His mercy and justice and find ourselves hungry no more.

We are full on the only sort of nutrient that lasts for eternity -- the body and blood of Christ. And we are glad.

I will pray for all of us this week to experience the gladness of forgiveness, friends.

You can find other activities for Epiphany at this post: 12+ Ways To Keep Celebrating With the Rest of the World (loads of links).


(See all Epiphany Daybook posts from 2018 here.)

Epiphany +6: Blessing and Woe

A weekly Epiphany devotional post for these 8 weeks of witness. Join us!

You can read here for a brief description of the liturgical season of Epiphany, and see previous Epiphany daybook 2019 posts here. Blessed Epiphany, friends!

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


Look: Sermon on the Mount (detail), Henrik Olrik

( source )

The season after Epiphany is winding down. In less than two weeks, we’ll begin Lent which puts us 40 days with Jesus on the road to the cross. Epiphany means more to me this year than in the past. It may be because it’s been a long season compared to some years. With Easter being later in the calendar we get to celebrate Epiphany for a full eight weeks this year.

The Gospel accounts of Epiphany show God being revealed through Christ more openly than ever as Jesus begins his three years of intentional ministry. This year I can’t get enough of them. I’m captivated by the paradox of Jesus as both the Son of God and the Son of Man.

In the article, What’s the Good News In the Season After Epiphany? , the author encapsulates the message of Epiphany: I’m here, says Jesus. Yes, and this hasn’t changed.

We often say that Jesus completed all the work God gave him to do from the manger to the cross. That’s true. The season of Epiphany adds technicolor dimension to the tiny preposition “to”. We meditate on the manger in Advent and Christmastide. We reflect on the cross in Lent and Eastertide. Epiphany is for the in between, and maybe that’s why I find it so enthralling. We live in the in between, in the “to” between the first coming to the second.

This week and next we are invited by the lectionary to listen again to Jesus preaching the earth-shattering truth of the Sermon on the Mount. May we welcome this shattering to our lives between law and grace, earth and heaven, the kingdom of God and the kingdom of man. From today to the world without end. Amen.


Listen: “Beatitudes”, from Live at Carnegie Hall, Sweet Honey In The Rock

Spotify | YouTube

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Epiphany - Beatitudes. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


Thus says the Lord:
’Cursed is the man who trusts in man
and makes flesh his strength,
whose heart turns away from the Lord.
He is like a shrub in the desert,
and shall not see any good come.
He shall dwell in the parched places of the wilderness,
in an uninhabited salt land.

’Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord,
whose trust is the Lord.
He is like a tree planted by water,
that sends out its roots by the stream,
and does not fear when heat comes,
for its leaves remain green,
and is not anxious in the year of drought,
for it does not cease to bear fruit.’

*

”He is like a tree
planted by streams of water
that yields its fruit in its season,
and its leaf does not wither.
In all that he does, he prospers.
The wicked are not so,
but are like chaff that the wind drives away.”

*

”And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.”

*

”And he lifted up his eyes on his disciples, and said:

“Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God.

“Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you shall be satisfied.

“Blessed are you who weep now, for you shall laugh.

“Blessed are you when people hate you and when they exclude you and revile you and spurn your name as evil, on account of the Son of Man! Rejoice in that day, and leap for joy, for behold, your reward is great in heaven; for so their fathers did to the prophets.

“But woe to you who are rich, for you have received your consolation.

“Woe to you who are full now, for you shall be hungry.

“Woe to you who laugh now, for you shall mourn and weep.

“Woe to you, when all people speak well of you, for so their fathers did to the false prophets.
— Jeremiah 17:5-8 * Psalm 1:3-4 * 1 Corinthians 15:17-20 * Luke 6:20-26 (ESV)

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer.


Pray:

O God, the strength of all who put their trust in you: Mercifully accept our prayers; and because in our weakness we can do nothing good without you, give us the help of your grace, that in keeping your commandments we may please you both in will and deed; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for Sixth Sunday After Epiphany

Do:

Bless each person you encounter

Silently or aloud, no matter the person and no matter the context

Practicing the Sermon on the Mount”, by Richard Foster:

“In the “beatitudes” Jesus takes up various kinds and classes of people that in his day were thought to be unblessed and unblessable, and he shows how the Kingdom of God is available to them and how they too can be blessed. No wonder the poor heard him gladly! As the Simon and Garfunkel song goes, “Blessed are the sat upon, spat upon, ratted on.”

In The Divine Conspiracy Dallas Willard gives contemporary expression to these “unblessed and unblessable-–the physically repulsive … the bald, the fat, and the old … the flunk-outs and drop-outs and burned outs. The broke and the broken. The drug heads and the divorced. The HIV-positive and herpes-ridden. The brain-damaged, the incurable ill. The barren and the pregnant too-many-times or the wrong time. The overemployed, the underemployed, the unemployed. The unemployable. The swindled, the shoved aside, the replaced… .” (pp. 123-124).

Ask yourself: How can I make the kingdom of God available to individuals who are humanly hopeless? Then as you go about your days, learn to take time to point out the natural beauty of every human being.”

You can find other activities for Epiphany at this post: 12+ Ways To Keep Celebrating With the Rest of the World (loads of links)


(See all Epiphany Daybook posts from 2018 here.)