Sixth Sunday of Eastertide: Going Away / Coming Down

The celebration continues with the Great Fifty Days called Eastertide. I hope you’re enjoying the Practice Resurrection series each week. Hallelujah! Christ is risen!


Look: Sky Ladder (2015), Cai Guo Qiang

 

Artist’s statement: “‘This is where I want to make a ladder to connect the Earth to the universe,’ said Cai in 1994, ahead of his first, unsuccessful attempt to realize the project. Bad weather kept him from attempting the piece. He was similarly stymied in Shanghai in 2001, due to post-9/11 security concerns, and in Los Angeles in 2012, when the permit was revoked due to the risk of forest fires.

It took 21 years, but Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang has finally brought to life his dramatic Sky Ladder, an explosive artwork in which a flaming ladder seems to miraculously float above the earth.

One of several artist known for exploring fireworks as an art medium, Cai was also responsible for the pyrotechnic display that marked the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

The artist actually built the fiery ladder to the heavens back in June, but only uploaded the video of the stunning work to YouTube this week, where it quickly caught fire online. Now a viral sensation, the artwork was a gift to Cai’s grandmother, who just turned a venerable 100 years old, and to the rest of his family and hometown of Quanzhou, China.”


Listen: “Butterfly”, Josh Garrels

Spotify | YouTube | Lyrics

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Resurrection 2019. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


And he carried me away in the Spirit to a great, high mountain, and showed me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God, “

*

”These things I have spoken to you while I am still with you. But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you. Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid. You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I will come to you.’ If you loved me, you would have rejoiced, because I am going to the Father, for the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you before it takes place, so that when it does take place you may believe.
— Revelation 21:10; John 14:25-29 (ESV)

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer. This week’s readings include the Baruch from the Apocrypha so I’ve linked to the RSV. Here’s a helpful commentary If you’re wondering if Anglicans (or other Protestants) read the Apocrypha.


Pray:

O God, you have prepared for those who love you such good things as surpass our understanding: Pour into our hearts such love towards you, that we, loving you in all things and above all things, may obtain your promises, which exceed all that we can desire; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for Sixth Sunday of Eastertide

Do:

50 Ways for 50 Days of Easter.png

In previous years, we've celebrated the Great 50 Days between Easter Sunday and Pentecost Sunday (aka, Eastertide) with a series I've dubbed Practice Resurrection (after the Wendell Berry poem). It's one of my favorite series all year, and I'm excited to start again. I need your photos and captions to make it work. To help prime the pump, I thought you might enjoy the list of ideas I brainstormed for simple ways to practice resurrection.

Choose 1 idea or 50, but whatever you do, do it with gusto!

Here's how you can share your photo stories with me for the blog:

1. Add something to your day that helps you practice resurrection (one day or fifty days -doesn't matter).

2. Take a picture and write a description in 1-50 words. 

3. Share it with me via email, share on my Facebook page, or tag me on Instagram (you can tag me with @a_sacramental_life or use the #PracticeResurrection2019 hashtag.) 

I look forward to hearing from you!


(See all Eastertide posts from 2018 here.)

Practice Resurrection with Brendah Ndagire (Uganda)

Welcome to the third guest post in a new-and-improved version of the the Practice Resurrection series!

I’ve invited several friends and acquaintances to share a snapshot of their lives during the weeks of Eastertide (between now and Pentecost Sunday, June 9th). As in other series of guest posts, I pray about who to invite and for this series I was contemplating the ways these women and men consistently invite us through their social media presence to regularly consider restoration, beauty, and goodness even, and maybe especially, in the face of difficulty. I’ve asked each guest to share snapshots of their present daily life inspired by Wendell Berry’s  poem, “Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front”.

This week’s post is from a woman I haven’t yet had the privilege to meet in real life, but have come to respect her perspective as a Ugandan woman telling her own story as well as advocating for others. Brendah consistently speaks with remarkable courage and passion for the marginalized in places throughout the world while also delighting in the beauty in her own life and each place that she’s lived. I’m so glad to be able to share her perspective of practicing resurrection right now. She gives us insight into wonder of the story of the post-resurrection appearance of Christ to his friends on the Emmaus Road and invites us to consider the ways we can join him in that very same conversation right now wherever we live.

First, take a moment to listen to Brendah reading us the poem from her home in Uganda.

 

Practicing Resurrection on the Road to Emmaus

(Luke 24:13-35)

Kasanvu community along the Uganda Railway, Greater Kampala Area, Uganda.  (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

Kasanvu community along the Uganda Railway, Greater Kampala Area, Uganda. (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

When we think about the practice of Christianity, the first ideas that come to mind are: to gather and participate in worship every Sunday morning, getting baptized, or sharing the word of the Lord and participate in Kingdom building, which is also known as discipleship. These acts are all wonderful and they should be celebrated. However, what is usually not paid attention to, is the practice of walking with the poor, the marginalized, the wanderers, and/or hopeless. I equate the latter, with the practice of resurrection, which is derived from Wendell Berry's “Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front.”

Plantain Farming in Kisoro District, Western Uganda.  (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

Plantain Farming in Kisoro District, Western Uganda. (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

In recognition of the Eastertide Season. I am focusing my attention on walking with the hopeless, those who struggle with doubt, who wonder, and those who may be poor in whatever way. After the Christ's resurrection, I love reflecting on Jesus' walk from the grave, the people He encountered on the way (His journey to be with His father), the conversation He had with them, and the encouragement and promises He left with them.

  If we were to paint an image of what was going on the Road to Emmaus, we would recognize some of the ways we can practice resurrection with the poor, the marginalized, the wanderers, and/or hopeless in our communities.

Street Kid carrying a bag of trash/rubbish in Kisenyi Slums, Kampala, Uganda.  (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

Street Kid carrying a bag of trash/rubbish in Kisenyi Slums, Kampala, Uganda. (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

In Luke 24:14-15, we would identify that people were talking with each other about EVERYTHING (probably about their brokenness over Christ's death, or personal brokenness, daily struggles, their doubts, discontents etc). In an age of social media and smartphones, Christians even in an economically poor nation like Uganda, barely have time to speak with each other about everything. If it is hard enough to speak with those whom we have a close relationship with, how likely that we would be able to speak with the economically poor, socially marginalized, and/or the hopeless in our communities? To practice resurrection is to SPEAK/TALK about everything with those we encounter on the way or in our communities.

What else was happening on that road to Emmaus?

  In Luke 24:17, we identify that Jesus also came along and walked with the people. But he did not stop there, He asked an open ended and provocative question, “what are you discussing together as you walk along?” And part of how we can practice resurrection is by asking questions and seek understanding from those we encounter on the way, on the streets, or in the ghettos/ slums of big cities.

For me, may be my questions may not be as rebuking as Jesus'. But when I walk in the streets or slums of Kampala, I am curious to know the stories of the people I encounter there. I ask myself: Why is this child living in this slum? What is s/he doing on the street? Why is/are s/he or they picking from the trash can? Why is this river in Kasanvu is so dirty and smelly? Why are people living near this river in the first place? What they doing for themselves to live a dignifying life? What can I do to affirm their dignity?

River in Kasanvu slum carrying some of the sewage from Kampala City, Uganda.  (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

River in Kasanvu slum carrying some of the sewage from Kampala City, Uganda. (Brendah Ndagire's photo)

There were many things happening on that road to Emmaus. Among these were Jesus reminding the people of who He was, and what had happened. I also want to point out another way we can practice resurrection, is inviting others (the poor, marginalized or hopeless) into our lives (see Luke 24:29- 30). It is not enough to ask questions, it is also important to invite, open our doors, and share our (whether scarce or abundant) resources with others, even when they seem not to be in need of them. At the invitation of Jesus Christ “to stay with them, ...He took Bread, gave thanks, broke it, and began to (share) it to them.” And once that happened, “they recognized Him.” I find that particular verse powerful. It teaches me that something beautiful and divine happens when we open our hearts, minds, and lives to strangers, to people who do not necessarily look, have a different economic status, believe/worship, act, or love like us. That too, is the practice of resurrection.


 Prayer for Practicing Resurrection

Give us grace, O God, to dare to do the deed which we well know cries to be done. Let us not hesitate because of ease, or the words of men’s mouths, or our own lives. Mighty causes are calling us - the freeing of women, the training of children, the putting down of hate and murder and poverty - all these and more. But they call with voices that mean work and sacrifice and death. Mercifully grant us, O God, the spirit of Esther, that we say: ‘I will go unto the King and if I perish, I perish.’ — Amen.
— Excerpt from Prayers for Dark People by W.E.B. Du Bois, ed. Herbert Aptheker. 1980. University of Mass Press, Amherst.

My Practice Resurrection Song

“All the Poor and Powerless” by All Sons & Daughters

YouTube | Lyrics

 

Brendah Ndagire is a Ugandan International Development Professional. She is currently working as a Communications Associate with Uganda Christian University (UCU) Partners - a freelance blog writer, writing stories of impact, empowerment, and affirmation. Interested in peace theology, feminism, social justice, and global politics.


(You can see all the Practice Resurrection 2019 guest posts here.)

Fifth Sunday of Eastertide: All Things New

The celebration continues with the Great Fifty Days called Eastertide. I hope you’re enjoying the Practice Resurrection series each week. Hallelujah! Christ is risen!


Look: Sun, Edvard Munch


Listen: “Alleluia” from Receive the Glory, Glad

Spotify | YouTube

Listen to my entire playlist on Spotify: Resurrection 2019. Add it to your account by clicking ‘Follow.’


Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord from the heavens; praise him in the heights!
Praise him, all his angels; praise him, all his hosts!

Praise him, sun and moon, praise him, all you shining stars!
Praise him, you highest heavens, and you waters above the heavens!

Let them praise the name of the Lord! For he commanded and they were created.
And he established them forever and ever; he gave a decree, and it shall not pass away.

Praise the Lord from the earth, you great sea creatures and all deeps, fire and hail, snow and mist, stormy wind fulfilling his word!

Mountains and all hills, fruit trees and all cedars!
Beasts and all livestock, creeping things and flying birds!

Kings of the earth and all peoples, princes and all rulers of the earth!
Young men and maidens together, old men and children!

Let them praise the name of the Lord, for his name alone is exalted; his majesty is above earth and heaven.
He has raised up a horn for his people, praise for all his saints, for the people of Israel who are near to him.
Praise the Lord!”

*

”Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

And he who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” Also he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.” And he said to me, “It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give from the spring of the water of life without payment.
— Psalm 148 * Revelation 21:1-6 (ESV)

Sunday:

Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year C). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 1), using the Psalm selections for Morning Prayer. This week’s readings include the Book of Wisdom from the Apocrypha so I’ve linked to the RSV. Here’s a helpful commentary If you’re wondering if Anglicans (or other Protestants) read the Apocrypha.


Pray:

Almighty God, whom truly to know is everlasting life: Grant us so perfectly to know your Son Jesus Christ to be the way, the truth, and the life, that we may steadfastly follow his steps in the way that leads to eternal life; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer, Collect for the Fifth Sunday in Eastertide

Do:

In previous years, we've celebrated the Great 50 Days between Easter Sunday and Pentecost Sunday (aka, Eastertide) with a series I've dubbed Practice Resurrection (after the Wendell Berry poem). It's one of my favorite series all year, and I'm excited to start again. I need your photos and captions to make it work. To help prime the pump, I thought you might enjoy the list of ideas I brainstormed for simple ways to practice resurrection.

Choose 1 idea or 50, but whatever you do, do it with gusto!

Here's how you can share your photo stories with me for the blog:

1. Add something to your day that helps you practice resurrection (one day or fifty days -doesn't matter).

2. Take a picture and write a description in 1-50 words. 

3. Share it with me via email, share on my Facebook page, or tag me on Instagram (you can tag me with @a_sacramental_life or use the #PracticeResurrection2019 hashtag.) 

I look forward to hearing from you!


(See all Eastertide posts from 2018 here.)

Weekend Daybook: our son's the funniest person in Austin (and not only in our opinion) & more!

Until Advent (minus some vacation weeks this summer) I’ll share some of the things helping me to worship God, love people, and enjoy beauty each week for you to peruse during your weekend downtime.

(1) photo (collage) from this week

HE WON!!!!!

Every year 200+ local comedians compete over a period of six weeks for the crown of "Funniest Person”, and this is the seventh year in a row Andrew’s competed. He’s made it at least to the semi-finals each year, but this was his year to take top prize. Thanks to friends for donating some of their air miles to us Brian made a last-minute decision to be in Austin. I’ve been proud of this guy for all SEVEN years he’s worked non-stop toward this goal. When Brian FaceTimed the girls and me in to hear Andrew’s acceptance speech (first photo below) we all kind of lost it. We love Andrew’s natural ability for humor and observation, and we’re proud of him for his tenacious work ethic. Almost every week of the past seven years, he’s worked multiple nights at open mics and scheduled shows. He’s faced the ridiculous risk of standing up in front of a (semi-sober) crowd and trying to make them laugh. Now the whole world knows, not only his family, that he’s the FUNNIEST PERSON IN AUSTIN.

Way to go, Andrew! We’ll always be your biggest fans!

Acceptance speech

Acceptance speech

Brothers

Brothers

Fan club

Fan club

Thanks to a stranger for posting this on FB!

Thanks to a stranger for posting this on FB!

Here’s a guest post I convinced Andrew to contribute waaaayyyy back in 2013: 8 Lessons I’ve Learned From 9 Months Doing Stand Up in Austin, TX (Maybe I’ll get him to give us a revised edition?!?)


(2) new blog posts this week!

  1. Fourth Sunday in Eastertide: Good Friday - Featuring one of my favorites, “The Shepherd of Sandtown” by Stephen Towns and more!

  2. Practice Resurrection with Sarah Quezada (Guatemala City & Atlanta) - Have you seen the second guest post in this year’s Practice Resurrection series yet?I haven’t had the privilege of meeting today’s guest in real life, but I’ve come to appreciate her deeply. In the past couple of years that immigration issues have been in the headlines more prominently, I’ve tried to discern the voices that engage well the intersection of public policy, human suffering, current headlines, and our Christian call for allegiance to the Kingdom of Jesus above all others. @sarahquezada is the voice that’s become one of the most valuable to me at this intersection.


(3) concert films we love/recommend


(4) posts in memory of Jean Vanier, CC, GOQ (September 10, 1928 – May 7, 2019)

  1. The Tender Power of Jean Vanier - “... we don’t know what to do with our own pain, so what to do with the pain of others? We don’t know what to do with our own weakness except hide it or pretend it doesn’t exist. So how can we welcome fully the weakness of another if we haven’t welcomed our own weakness?" | via OnBeing

  2. I’m looking forward to this book! Jean Vanier: Portrait of a Free Man by Anne-Sophie Constant & translated by Allen Page (coming August 2019) - “It’s a crazy story. In August 1964 a thirty-six-year-old Canadian from a famous family – one who has already joined the navy during war at age thirteen, become an officer, earned a PhD, and taught ethics at the University of Toronto – takes up residence in a little house he just bought in the village of Trosly, France, with two mentally disabled men he has removed from a care home." | via Plough Publishing

  3. Ten Rules For Life To Become More Human from Jean Vanier - To commemorate the occasion he released a YouTube video laying out his “ten rules for life to become more human” by sharing his thoughts on life and on growing older. He speaks about success, vulnerability, listening, fear and love. “I have to change. And what is that change? To become more human.” | via The Tablet

  4. Jean Vanier Made Us All More Human by Bethany McKinney Fox - “The late founder of L’Arche showed the church how disability, vulnerability, and weakness bring us closer to one another and closer to Jesus." | via Christianity Today


(5) more notes on Spring & Eastertide

  1. Five of Our Favorite Spring Poems - from Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Liberty Hyde Bailey, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Christina Rossetti | via Englewood Review of Books

  2. “Very Early Morning” by Luci Shaw - That Timothy Botts illustration! “now / make our hearts a field / to raise Your praise.” | via Global Christian Worship

  3. New York walks: 13 perfect strolls for warmer weather - My new bucket list! | via Curbed

  4. Eastertide: How to Party Like A Christian by Lacy Finn Borgo - “Here’s the rub—partying in our culture and our time is uneventful. Our normal lives are loaded with indulgences. “Who cares if we have cake, we can have cake every day,” we say. | via Renovaré

  5. My Spring playlist on Spotify - I’m especially proud of this one!


(6) photos from the few sunny days we’ve had in May in Fairfield County, CT!


(7) blog posts from this week in the archives

  1. 2016 - Murphy people updates in a season of Fortunate Events (Still recovering from that year!)

  2. 2014 - 5 favorites: surprise discoveries in May (I need to get re-surprised by some things on this list.)

  3. 2013 - Take Up Something New: repurposing curb-side trash to furniture treasure (Glennon Interiors) (My brilliant cousin shared a guest post!)

  4. 2011 - Bread of Life (My stab at poetry.)

  5. 2009 - Lester G. Morgan, 1911 - 2009 (We give thanks for Brian’s dear grandfather and middle namesake.)

  6. 2009 - re:Imagine [worship & arts retreat] (Some good, old memories here.)

  7. 2007 - Grief (We also give thanks - in a different way - for Brian’s father each May.)

Alex busking.jpeg

4 years ago

May 2015 - When Alex was interning at the White House he spent evenings and weekends busking on Capitol Hill to help support his quest to ask Rebekah to marry him. (Maybe some person you elected helped contribute to my son's engagement - you never know? )


May your weekend include plenty of space to practice resurrection. Hallelujah! Christ is risen, friends!

p.s. This post may contain affiliate links because I'm trying to be a good steward, and when you buy something through one of these links you don't pay more money, but in some magical twist of capitalism we get a little pocket change. Thanks!

Practice Resurrection with Sarah Quezada (Guatemala City & Atlanta)

Welcome to the second guest post in a new-and-improved version of the the Practice Resurrection series!

I’ve invited several friends and acquaintances to share a snapshot of their lives during the weeks of Eastertide (between now and Pentecost Sunday, June 9th). As in other series of guest posts, I pray about who to invite and for this series I was contemplating the ways these women and men consistently invite us through their social media presence to regularly consider restoration, beauty, and goodness even, and maybe especially, in the face of difficulty.

I haven’t had the privilege of meeting today’s guest in real life, but I’ve come to appreciate her deeply. In the past couple of years that immigration issues have been in the headlines more prominently, I’ve tried to discern the voices that engage well the intersection of public policy, human suffering, current headlines, and our Christian call for allegiance to the Kingdom of Jesus above all others. Sarah Quezada is the voice that’s become one of the most valuable to me at this intersection. If you’re looking for a trustworthy teacher in this conversation, go sign up for her weekly newsletter right now.

Sarah graciously accepted my invitation to share snapshots her life inspired by Wendell Berry’s  poem, “Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front”. To help us all get a bit more familiar with the masterpiece, I asked each contributor to include a simple recording of themselves reading the poem out loud to us.

Here’s Sarah reading us the poem from her porch. She has such a lovely reading voice so make sure you turn on the sound!

 

Ask the questions that have no answers.

There are so many things I do not understand. My mind fills with questions, not the least of which is "Where is God?" But I find myself hearing only one response. God is near to the broken-hearted. God is present. In every sorrow, in every joy, in every unanswered question, God is present.

Sarah Quezada2 .jpg

Say that your main crop is the forest / that you did not plant, / that you will not live to harvest.

Sometimes we build and create under trees we didn't plant. Enjoy the good gifts God - and those who've walked our ground before us - have offered us.

Sarah Quezada2.jpg

Put your faith in the two inches of humus / that will build under the trees / every thousand years.

Things fall down. Even tall, beautiful trees can lay down across our path. One part of me grieves this death of something strong and statuesque. Another part of me watches as its regal falling allows two kids to rise to new heights, to experience their strength and grow.

Sarah Quezada3.jpg

Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful / though you have considered all the facts.

Parenting has been a constant reminder to me that life is up and down. I want the cuddles and the giggles, but more often than not, it feels like it the days are met with laundry, snacks, and meltdowns. But even when we know the facts, we cannot help but laugh with the joyful moments. Each day is filled with the good and the hard. So we expect what feels like the end of the world. And we laugh, too.

Sarah Quezada4.jpg

So, friends, every day do something / that won’t compute.

Life is hard. Do everything you can to create. 

Sarah Quezada5.jpg

So long as women do not go cheap / for power, please women more than men. / Ask yourself: Will this satisfy / a woman satisfied to bear a child? / Will this disturb the sleep / of a woman near to giving birth?

"I saw God's presence when I was arrested."

A woman we met on our trip to Oaxaca shared her story of leaving Honduras after her son was threatened by gang members. She told us how she and her children had been separated from her husband during the journey. (It seemed they had later found each other again.) They were waiting in Oaxaca, trusting God for their next steps.

Someone asked where she had witnessed God's presence on her trip. That's when she gave God the glory for her arrest. My jaw dropped.

She said she hadn't eaten in several days and was near passing out when she was apprehended. She spent about a week in immigration detention in Mexico - eating and sleeping - before being released.

I think somewhere along the way I internalized a theology that I think now may be "Prosperity Gospel Lite." I don't expect wealth and power and influence if I follow God.

But I do expect average. I expect a baseline level of comfort, security, and ease. When something happens that ricochets me too far from the middle, I'm all "Where are you, God?!? What is happening?!?"

But lately, I've been thinking about this arrest testimony and the profound faith I've witnessed among the poor in the States. And it's got me thinking that that perhaps what's not surprising is the injustice, the pain, the suffering. It's the world humans have built. Yet God is constantly present, showing up in moments of grace and mercy.

Collectively, we chose darkness. But the light keeps showing up and breaking through.


Practice resurrection.

It's easy to be distracted by the color and cacophony around us. Even the light at the end of the tunnel can draw our focus. Sometimes, though, if we look up, we will see light.

Sarah Quezada6.jpg

Sarah Quezada bio.jpg

Sarah Quezada writes about social justice, immigration, faith, and living across cultures. Her first book Love Undocumented: Risking Trust in a Fearful World was published in January 2018. Her writing has also been featured on Christianity TodayRelevant, Sojourners, ChurchLeaders.com, Off the Page, and elsewhere.

Sarah’s husband Billy emigrated from Guatemala City, and they met and married in Los Angeles. Together, they've walked through complex U.S. immigration system and delightfully enjoy the humor and craziness of a cross-cultural, bilingual relationship.

The Quezada’s home is in the heart of Atlanta, Georgia, where they try to be good neighbors and engage in Christian community development. They love the CCDA (Christian Community Development Association), and Sarah is a member of their Emerging Leaders cohort.

During the Spring of 2019, Sarah and her family are living in Guatemala City, Guatemala, where they’ve founded Bridge, a job creation initiative that is creating building products from recycled materials.

Sarah and Billy have two kids - Gabriella and Isaac - and they are trying their best to raise them bicultural and trilingual-ish. To that end, they speak as much Spanglish as possible at home, and they study Mandarin in school.

Find Sarah on Facebook, Instagram, and her website. Purchase her book and sign up for her weekly newsletter, The Road Map.


(You can see all the Practice Resurrection 2019 guest posts here.)