Lent Daybook, 34: The Cry That Will Be Heard

Lent Daybook, 34: The Cry That Will Be Heard

Welcome to a Lent daybook for these 40 days of prayer. Click through the link to see the full post.

Look: The Cry That Will Be Heard, 1969, and Community, 1982, Sister Corita Kent - Source

Listen: “Crucifixus a 8 voci” from Allegri: Miserere, Cantillation, Antony Walker, Brett Weymark - Spotify | YouTube | Latin text & English translation

Read: Psalm 137:1-9; Psalm 144; Jeremiah 31:27-34; Romans 11:25-36; John 12:37-50

Pray & Do: Read, reflect, and repent with An American Lent (Week 6).

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On the Seventh Day of Christmas: Savor the Feast of New Year's Eve

My Christmas daybook for these 12 days of celebrating. We'll be spending Christmastide with some favorite short films and video clips. Join me, won't you? 

For an introduction read this post: Christmastide.

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


CLICK ON THE PHOTO TO GET TO VIDEO HOME PAGE:  FEAST BY MATT ZOLLER SEITZ

CLICK ON THE PHOTO TO GET TO VIDEO HOME PAGE: FEAST BY MATT ZOLLER SEITZ

Just yesterday I caught myself downloading a fasting app on my phone. You heard me right. On the fifth day of Christmas, I thought I should start fasting. At one level, it makes sense. We’ve been consuming a whole lot of sugar, meat, and delicious ginger beer/vodka drinks and not a whole lot of vegetables. My body was probably trying to tell me something. How perfectly human of me to download an app to remind me not to eat for 12-16 hours rather than just walking to the fridge for some carrots and celery.

If you’ve been around here any number of years, you’ve heard me quote my Mama every Christmastide: “While we feast, we savor.” I’ve also shared one of my top lessons since following the liturgical calendar: In some ways celebration requires more discipline than sober contemplation.

Add to that a mild to severe case of post-family-visit blues and I subconsciously attempted to hit the Christmastide eject button before it was even half over.

Today’s New Year’s Eve. Maybe you’ve got a whole lot of goals that you plan to kickstart tomorrow, the first day of 2019. That’s fine. But for today, let’s keep feasting. Here’s five more clips plus one playlist highlighting the joy of festive celebration. Cheers!

p.s., I’ll be checking into that intermittent fasting app after January 6, the Feast of Epiphany!

Watch:

  1. Feast, Matt Zoller Seitz for the Museum of Moving Image

    (Technically, this video was made for Thanksgiving, but I love it for Christmastide as well. If you can’t get it to play from this post, click the link here to go to the original page. If you like food and movies, you’ll be glad you did.)

  2. Happy New Year, Orange Mobile

  3. Grilled Shrimp with Peanuts and Lime, Tiger In A Jar

  4. How to Make the Ultimate Cheese Board, Bon Appétit

  5. Dark Moon, Bon Appétit

  6. 10 Vintage New Year’s Eve Movies - 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s, (I’dd add When Harry Met Sally for the 90s!)

Listen: my New Year’s Eve playlist on Spotify


Leader: To gather joyfully is indeed a serious affair, for feasting and all enjoyments gratefully taken are, at their heart, acts of war.

People: In celebrating this feast we declare that evil and death, suffering and loss, sorrow and tears, will not have the final word.

But the joy of fellowship, and the welcome and comfort of friends new and old, and the celebration of these blessings of food and drink and conversation and laughter are the true evidences of things eternal, and are the first fruits of that great glad joy that is to come and that will be unending.

So let our feast this day be joined to those sure victories secured by Christ.
Let it be to us now a delight, and a glad foretaste of his eternal kingdom.
Bless us, O Lord, in this feast.

Bless us, O Lord, as we linger over our cups, And over tables laden with good things, as we relish the delights of varied texture and flavor,
Of aromas and savory spices,
Of dishes prepared as acts of love and blessing,
Of sweet delights made sweeter by the communion of saints.

May this shared meal, and our pleasure in it, bear witness against the artifice and deceptions of the prince of the darkness that would blind this world to hope.
May it strike at the root of the lie that would drain life of meaning, and the world of joy, and suffering of redemption.
May this our feast fall like a great hammer blow against that brittle night,
Shattering the gloom, reawakening our hearts,
stirring our imaginations, focusing our vision
On the kingdom of heaven that is to come
On the kingdom that is promised
On the kingdom that is already, indeed, among us,
For the resurrection of all good things has already joyfully begun.

May this feast be an echo of that great supper of the Lamb,
and a foreshadowing of the great celebration that awaits the children of God.

Where two or more of us are gathered, O Lord, there you have promised to be
And here we are
And so, here are you.
Take joy, O King, in this our feast.
Take joy, O King!

Leader: All will be well!
Participants then take up the cry: All will be well!

Nothing good and right and true will be lost forever. All good things will be restored.
Feast and be reminded!
Take joy, little flock. Take joy!
Let battle be joined!
Let battle be joined!

Now you who are loved by the Father, prepare your hearts and give yourselves wholly to this celebration of joy, to the glad company of saints, to the comforting fellowship of the Spirit, and to the abiding presence of Christ who is seated among us both as our host and as our honored guest, and still yet as our conquering king.
Amen.

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, take seat, take feast, take delight!
— Douglas Kaine McKelvey, Every Moment Holy

Do:

Feast in the New Year

 More friends, more feasting, more game-playing, more music.  Savor the excess.

[from my 2013 post: "My Mama’s Rule For Feasting."

“My mother created a rule for feasting years ago. As a family, we'd often be invited into other people's homes for mouth-watering meals, but too many times the dinner conversation revolved around the fattening, unhealthy qualities we consumed. It felt like each dish spooned onto our plate came heaped with sides of shame and guilt.  At her own dinner table, my mother would not tolerate this sort of pious, joy-wrecking conversation.  This is how she taught us her motto for hospitality: While we feast, we savor.

This is no way to feast, friends. Keeping in mind that legalism kills, but order brings life to our family celebrations, Brian and I keep my mother's rule close to heart. While we feast, we savor. At Christmas, we savor every sort of gift - food, music, family, friends, and the boxes and bags we wrap up and hand to each other.  All of it -- the ones we give and the ones we receive -- unearned.  All of it, grace.”


(See all Christmas Daybook posts from 2017 here.)

On the Third Day of Christmas: 3 Mulled Cider Recipes for St. John's Day

My Christmas daybook for these 12 days of celebrating. We'll be spending Christmastide with some favorite short films and video clips. Join me, won't you? 

For an introduction read this post: Christmastide. You can see previous Christmas Daybook 2018 posts here.

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


Watch:

  1. Cranberry Mulled Cider, Tiger in a Jar

  2. Mulled Wine, perfect Christmas drink

  3. Slow Cooker Crock Pot Mulled Wine

 

The Cranberry Mulled Cider is our go-to beverage throughout Advent and Christmastide (and what we served during cocktail hour of our son’s wedding three Januarys ago). We love to add bourbon for the adults in the room. The other two variations looked promising. Let me know if you try one!

The Third Day of Christmas - December 27th
The Feast of St. John

The Feast of St. John the Evangelist is the second of three Prayer Book Holy Days immediately following Christmas Day.  The third and final Mass of Christmas, the "Mass of the Day", has as its Gospel the beginning of St. John's Gospel which proclaims the mystery of the Word made flesh.  Today would be a particularly good day to spend some time reading and meditating on John 1: 1-14.

Tradition tells us that John was once given a cup of poisoned wine, but drank it with no ill effect.  A chalice with a serpent signifying the powerless poison is one of his symbols.  In spite of exile and attempts to kill him, John lived to a great old age.  In his last years it is said that he had to be carried to the assembly of the Church and, when he was asked to speak, he would say, simply, "My dear children, love one another."

 

Shed upon your Church, O Lord, the brightness of your light, that we, being illumined by the teaching of your apostle and evangelist John, may so walk in the light of your truth, that at length we may attain to the fullness of eternal life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer

Do:

Bless the wine

It is the custom to bless wine on St. John's day, and to drink a toast to the love of God and to the saint.

The Blessing of Wine on St. John's Day

Lord Jesus Christ, Thou didst call Thyself the vine and Thy holy Apostles the branches; and out of all those who love Thee, Thou didst desire to make a good vineyard. Bless this wine and pour into it the might of Thy benediction.  Grant that every one who drinks of it may, through the intercession of Thy beloved disciple the holy Apostle and Evangelist John, find courage and strength to pursue the Way, be renewed in the Truth of the Word made flesh, and at the last enter into Life everlasting, who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever.  Amen.

A glass of wine is then passed around the table. 

As it is passed, the giver says: Drink to the love of St. John.

And the recipient answers: For where love is, there is God.


(See all Christmas Daybook posts from 2017 here.)

Lent Daybook, 20: Do we not have the right to eat and drink?

A Lent daybook for these 40 days of prayer. Join me, won't you?  (see previous Lent daybook 2018 posts here)

Is this your first time to practice Lent?  Here's a simple introduction: How we prepare for Lent.

*Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.*


   "Siblings Julie, Antonio, and India Abram collect their daily allowance of bottled water from Fire Station #3. Located on Martin Luther King Avenue, it is one of five firehouses that have become water resource sites in Flint, Michigan." by Wayne Lawrence, National Geographic ( source )

 

"Siblings Julie, Antonio, and India Abram collect their daily allowance of bottled water from Fire Station #3. Located on Martin Luther King Avenue, it is one of five firehouses that have become water resource sites in Flint, Michigan." by Wayne Lawrence, National Geographic (source)


music for today: "The Greatest Gift", Sufjan Stevens (lyrics)

SpotifyVimeo


Then Joseph prepared his chariot and went up to meet Israel his father in Goshen. He presented himself to him and fell on his neck and wept on his neck a good while.”

*

”As a deer pants for flowing streams,
so pants my soul for you, O God.
My soul thirsts for God,
for the living God.”

*

”This is my defense to those who would examine me. Do we not have the right to eat and drink? Do we not have the right to take along a believing wife, as do the other apostles and the brothers of the Lord and Cephas? Or is it only Barnabas and I who have no right to refrain from working for a living? Who serves as a soldier at his own expense? Who plants a vineyard without eating any of its fruit? Or who tends a flock without getting some of the milk?”

*

”And taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven and said a blessing and broke the loaves and gave them to the disciples to set before the people. And he divided the two fish among them all. And they all ate and were satisfied. And they took up twelve baskets full of broken pieces and of the fish. And those who ate the loaves were five thousand men.
— Genesis 46:29 * Psalm 42:1 * 1 Corinthians 9:3-8 * Mark 6:41-44 (ESV)

* Monday - Thursday Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 2). On Fridays, I'll include the Scripture readings for the upcoming Sunday which are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year B).


prayer for today:

Grant, O God, that your holy and life-giving Spirit may so move every human heart, especially mine, that barriers which divide us may crumble, suspicions disappear, and hatred cease; that our divisions being healed, we may live in justice and peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
— The Pilgrim's Prayer for Repentance via An American Lent (therepentanceproject.com)

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Spiritual practice for today:

Each week during Lent, we will devote Thursdays to acts of repentance. It's God's kindness that leads us to repentance, and in His kindness and provision for reconciliation, He invites us to make confession and ask for forgiveness on behalf of not only ourselves but our forefathers and mothers. We carry a heavy load of guilt and grief in our nation as a result of centuries of grievous sin and unrelenting injustice against African Americans. 

I've added to my personal Lenten reading this year the brief daily posts called An American Lent, a collaboration between Coracle and The Repentance Project. I commend the readings to you, and if nothing else, consider reading and signing the call to action entitled Statement of Repentance

  • If you only have time to read one post, read Tuesday's post ("Nutrition and the Food We Eat") by Max Finberg, including the articles he links such as the USDA's Food Insecurity by Household Characteristics (one out of five African-American households (21.5%), and one in 10 (10%) White households)

  • Read Proverbs 20:17 and Leviticus 19:9-10. Listen to the Holy Spirit's prompting and conviction as you read.

  • Read the USDA's definition of "food deserts" and interact with the food access atlas

  • Pray through the Reflection/Repentance prompts in the post, and with each meal today pray for those who do not have enough or the right kind of food and ask God to give you direction on how you can contribute to a more just food system in your community. 

  • Pray through the words and consider signing the Statement of Repentance.


(see all Lent daybook posts from 2017 here)

Christmas Daybook, 3: mulled wine for St. John's Feast Day

Welcome to my Christmas daybook for these 12 days of celebrating. We'll be spending Christmastide with some favorite short films and video clips. Join me, won't you? 

( source )
 

Cranberry Mulled Cider via Tiger In A Jar 

The third day of Christmas is also the feast day of Saint John the Apostle. Throughout church history, Christians have celebrated this feast day with mulled wine

St. John the Apostle, is the disciple "whom Jesus loved". It is a custom in the old countries to drink of "St. John's Love". The Church provided a special blessing of wine in honor of the Saint. According to legend St. John drank a glass of poisoned wine without suffering harm because he had blessed it before he drank. The wine is also a symbol of the great love of Christ that filled St. John's heart with loyalty, courage and enthusiasm for his Master; he alone of all the apostles was not afraid to stay close to Our Lord during the Passion and Crucifixion.

Here's a simple recipe for St. John's Love (mulled wine) from a liturgical resource. Or you can make a non-alcoholic version with the cranberry cider recipe in the video above. (I've written out the recipe in this old post.) 

For what it's worth, our family likes to add a little bourbon to our glasses of hot cider. As our children have become adults, this has become a favorite family tradition throughout the 12 days of Christmas!


Today's readings: John by Malcolm Guite for the Feast Day of Saint John the Apostle

May I suggest, if not today then sometime within the new year, a reading of the entire book of John in one (or two) sittings? I had the opportunity to do that this Advent and it was deeply meaningful.

Prayer for today:

Shed upon your Church, O Lord, the brightness of your light, that we, being illumined by the teaching of your apostle and evangelist John, may so walk in the light of your truth, that at length we may attain to the fullness of eternal life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Book of Common Prayer

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Make time to stay home

{an excerpt from my post 12 Ways To Savor the 12 Days of Christmas}

Read, watch movies, play games, take naps, take walks in the neighborhood. In our house, we're especially fond of the tradition of wearing pajamas all day as often as possible during Christmas.

(read more here)


(See all Christmas Daybook posts from 2016 here.)