Weekend Daybook: breaking of bread edition

A curated list of what I've been up to lately: places, people, books, podcasts, music, links & more for your weekend downtime.

 
We cannot love God unless we love each other, and to love we must know each other. We know Him in the breaking of bread, and we know each other in the breaking of bread, and we are not alone anymore. Heaven is a banquet and life is a banquet, too, even with a crust, where there is companionship.
— Dorothy Day
 

— 1 —

photo from my week

Central Square, NY

Central Square, NY

Man, I love weddings, and we were lucky to be invited to celebrate with this precious couple and their families this weekend. We used to live across the street from each other in the best little town in the Southern Tier of NY.

They were more than our neighbors, but also our friends, class and teammates, students, and first doors to knock on when we needed anything. In those days Brian and I were barely figuring out how to care for our kids, our home, and our jobs. These neighbors welcomed us and made us part of a tight-knit community. We literally walked through floods and fire together.

In all of our moves since 2008 we’ve never had better neighbors. We haven’t seen each other for about a decade but it felt like no time at all.

God bless you, Chelsea and Jeffrey. You’ve got pretty great people surrounding you, and we’re really proud to know you. If you ever need us, we’d be honored to return all the favors your family’s given us all those years ago. ♥️


— 2 —

posts to praise my old hometown

  1. The Beautiful Bones Of Binghamton via Urban Phoenix

  2. Binghamton: A City of Two Tales via Urban Phoenix


Illustration:   Sarah Lazarovic

Illustration: Sarah Lazarovic


— 4 —

favorite autumnal movies

  1. Dan in Real Life starring Steve Carell

  2. Hoosiers starring Gene Hackman

  3. When Harry Met Sally starring Meg Ryan & Billy Crystal

  4. Fantastic Mr. Fox directed by Wes Anderson

 

— 5 —

links to help us celebrate and thank indigenous peoples on October 14

  1. Being Native American in the US via Mark Charles

  2. The head of National Museum of the American Indian on what we should all know via Washington Post

  3. Layli Long Soldier: The Freedom of Real Apologies via OnBeing with Krista Tippett (Don’t miss Layli Long Soldier’s poem excerpts here.)

  4. What reconciliation is and what it is not via Working Effectively With Indigenous Peoples Blog

  5. Buy this book! Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery by Mark Charles & Soong-Chan Rah

    Find Publishers Weekly’s review here.

 

— 6 —

important words about the justice required for true reconciliation

  1. Let’s not ask Botham Jean’s family to choose forgiveness over justice by Shane Claiborne via RNS

  2. Botham Jean’s Brother’s Offer of Forgiveness Went Viral. His Mother’s Calls for Justice Should Too. by Dorena Williamson via CT

  3. Jemar Tisby On Race and the American Church via Fuller Studio’s Conversing With Mark Labberton (also this episode with John Perkins)

  4. Reparations is a spiritual issue by Nibs Stroupe via The Christian Century

  5. Racial Reconciliation: No Handholding Kumbaya by Rev. Dr. Brian A. Tillman via ReThink Church

  6. What Is the Father’s Heart For Justice? by Jacalyn Barnes, Director of the Repentance Project via Coracle


Homeschooling35.jpeg

8 years ago

During our first autumn in Austin both my daughters chose to homeschool in order to give themselves time to acclimate to our new city. Here Kendra’s reading Shakespeare to Natalie, and my heart kind of explodes whenever I look back on this hard but beautiful season.

You can read more of our adventures here: Homeschool Daybook


May your weekend include some rest and some fun with friends and family. Peace...

p.s. This post may contain affiliate links because I'm trying to be a good steward, and when you buy something through one of these links you don't pay more money, but in some magical twist of capitalism we get a little pocket change. Thanks!

On the Tenth Day of Christmas: 10+ Beautifully Made Commercials To Indulge Your Sentimental Side

My Christmas daybook for these 12 days of celebrating. We'll be spending Christmastide with some favorite short films and video clips. Join me, won't you? 

For an introduction read this post: Christmastide. You can see previous Christmas Daybook 2018 posts here.

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


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TRIGGER WARNING! PLEASE BE ADVISED: THIS POST CONTAINS HIGHER THAN RECOMMENDED DAILY ALLOWANCE OF SAP. PROCEED AT YOUR OWN RISK.

I basically refuse to watch Christmas commercials until after the gifts have all been purchased and given. I’m too susceptible to the manipulation! So, today I’m sitting back and letting my sentimental side fly free. Want to join in?

p.s., Are British Christmas adverts far and away better than anyone else’s? Or is it just me? Whatever this John Lewis company is selling, I’ll buy all of it! I’ve added a couple more runners-up toward the bottom of the list. The Heathrow Airport bears get me.

p.s. #2: Don’t miss the bonus “making of” for behind the scenes of an animated commercial - it’s almost as good as the actual thing!

p.s. #3, If the first nine selections weren’t enough, you can power through the ten more clips in the last link. Good luck.

Watch:

  1. John Lewis - Buster the Boxer, Blink

  2. John Lewis - The Long Wait, Blink

  3. John Lewis - The Journey, Blink

  4. John Lewis - Monty’s Christmas, Blink

  5. John Lewis - The Bear & The Hare and The Making of ‘The Bear & The Hare’, Blink

  6. Heathrow Airport - Coming Home for Christmas, Outsider

  7. Heathrow Airport - Home For Christmas, Outsider

  8. Erste Christmas Ad 2018: What Would Christmas Be Without Love?

  9. Lily and the Snowman, Cineplex

  10. Top 10 Touching Christmas Commercials, Jake’s Top 10

 

Read: Psalm 136; Genesis 28:10-22; Hebrews 11:13-22; John 10:7-17

Pray that “hopes and fears of all the years” for each one who celebrates Christmas would meet the One who gives above and beyond our every imagination.

The great majority of people will go on observing forms that cannot be explained; they will keep Christmas Day with Christmas gifts and Christmas benedictions; they will continue to do it; and some day suddenly wake up and discover why.
— "Christmas Day" by G.K. Chesterton, Generally Speaking

Do:

Stay firmly rooted in the Incarnation story

[from my 2013 post: “12 Ways to Savor the 12 Days of Christmas”]

“Keep reading after the manger, celebrate the magi's arrival, pray the words of Simeon and Anna in the temple. Notice the characters, ask the Father of Jesus to make you worshipers like the very first who bowed in adoration to His son.”


(See all Christmas Daybook posts from 2017 here.)

On the Ninth Day of Christmas: 9 All-Time Favorite Musical Moments in Christmas Movies

My Christmas daybook for these 12 days of celebrating. We'll be spending Christmastide with some favorite short films and video clips. Join me, won't you? 

For an introduction read this post: Christmastide. You can see previous Christmas Daybook 2018 posts here.

Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.


I realize I may be the only blogger in the Western world still creating posts about Christmas. So be it. It’s my own version of resistance and I’m taking a kind of stubborn pride in not giving up until we’ve celebrated all 12 days here at A Sacramental Life. God, forgive me for my pride, but sustain anything holy in my resistance. Are you still with me?

Today: nine (+) of my all-time favorite musical moments in the Christmas movies we watch year after year. Have you ever considered Christmas carols as their own form of resistance to the what Walter Brueggemann would call, the empire? This is why I could never completely withhold from singing Christmas carols during Advent. The world is subconsciously (or otherwise) bowing the knee to King Jesus with every verse of “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing” or “Joy to the World” streaming through mall intercoms hither and yon. Not all of my favorite Christmas movie carols can be found in a hymnbook, but hidden even in the humanistic poetry of White Christmas there’s a holy longing for peace, justice, and beauty.

That’s why I’m still listening to Christmas carols and watching Christmas movies on January 2nd. Who’s with me?

  1. Ding, Dong, Merrily On High & Deck the Halls - Little Women

  2. Christmas Time Is Here - Charlie Brown Christmas

  3. Snow - White Christmas

  4. One More Sleep Til Christmas - Muppets Christmas Carol

  5. The Spirit of Christmas (Ray Charles) - National Lampoons Christmas Vacation

  6. White Christmas (The Drifters) - Home Alone

  7. White Christmas - White Christmas

  8. Hark the Herald Angels Sing & Auld Lany Syne - It’s A Wonderful Life

  9. Silent Night & Adeste Fidelis- Joyeux Noel


Read: Psalm 33; Genesis 12:1-7; Hebrews 11:1-12; John 6:35-42, 48-51

Pray this poem/prayer for the beginning of a New Year:

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
The flying cloud, the frosty light;
The year is dying in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

Ring out the old, ring in the new,
Ring, happy bells, across the snow;
The year is going, let him go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.

Ring out the grief that saps the mind,
For those that here we see no more;
Ring out the feud of rich and poor,
Ring in redress to all mankind.

Ring out a slowly dying cause,
And ancient forms of party strife;
Ring in the nobler modes of life,
With sweeter manners, purer laws.

Ring out the want, the care, the sin,
The faithless coldness of the times;
Ring out, ring out my mournful rimes
But ring the fuller minstrel in.

Ring out false pride in place and blood,
The civic slander and the spite;
Ring in the love of truth and right,
Ring in the common love of good.

Ring out old shapes of foul disease;
Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
Ring out the thousand wars of old,
Ring in the thousand years of peace.

Ring in the valiant man and free,
The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
Ring out the darkness of the land,
Ring in the Christ that is to be.
— "A New Year's Poem", Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

Do:

 Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Write thank-you cards or New Year’s greetings


[from my 2013 post: “12 Ways to Savor the 12 Days of Christmas”]

“When I was growing up my mother always sent her annual family newsletter at New Year's. Makes sense, right? Some years I set up a card-writing station on our dining table so that throughout the week we all take turns writing thank you-cards.”

Here’s some excellent encouragement from Rachel Marie Stone, via Englewood Review of Books: Write A Better Year End Letter. If you’d rather just have a good laugh about not sending any cards, read Simcha Fisher’s How To Write An Honest Christmas Letter.


(See all Christmas Daybook posts from 2017 here.)

Weekend Daybook: joy in the tension edition

Seven days of collecting what I've been up to lately: places, people, books, podcasts, music, links & more for your weekend downtime.


(1) photo from the week

September.Inklings candle1.JPG

A homey scene from this past week. I love this little bookish candle and really wish someone would enroll me in Frostbeard’s candle-of-the-month club. (Christmas is like 3 months away now, right?)


(2) new posts in the Work Stories series

  1. Work Stories: Amy Willers' calling in a life transition (I’ve been enjoying hearing from many of you on how much you’re appreciating this series!)

  2. 5 Of My Favorite Authors on Discovering & Honoring Our Calling (Little booster shots of hope that our calling matters in ways that bring joy to us and goodness to those around us.)


(3) things I enjoyed watching in the last couple of months

  1. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (There’s been quite a buzz around this beautiful documentary, and all of it well-earned. See this film. I’m afraid to mention that I bawled right in the movie theatre in case you’re the type of person scared away by feelings. Go anyway.)

  2. The Assets (This series based on the true story of CIA officers in the 1980s look for a mole to save the lives of Soviet agents working for the U.S. is eerily timely again. The story of Aldrich Ames is unbelievable, but true. The women who devote years of their work lives to catch him are unbelievable, but real. Also, Jodie Whittaker is one of my favorite actresses even when she’s acting with an American accent.)

  3. Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society (Loved the book and thoroughly enjoyed the movie!)


(4) links that felt helpful to me during this week in the news

A screenshot from what I shared on  Instagram  this week inspired by the way someone reached out to me.

A screenshot from what I shared on Instagram this week inspired by the way someone reached out to me.

There’s a time and place for each one of us to dive deep into a particular news story in order to engage with the realities surrounding us and to steward our relationships with our neighbors. There’s a time and place for each of us to unplug from the stream of news in order to steward our own hearts, minds, and souls. Most of the time, I’ve found myself somewhere in the middle. These links represent what I chose to engage during the news spectacle of the Ford-Kavanaugh hearings.

Click on this link to hear the healing experience that happened to me this week.

  1. Pantsuit Politics and Left, Right, and Center episodes (I have given up on televised news, and find these resources and a few others helpful to represent a collection of voices on current events.)

  2. Believing Women in an Age of Narcissism by Chuck DeGroat

  3. Between Brock Turner and Brett Kavanaugh, when do girls matter? by Simcha Fisher

  4. 12 Motivations Victims of Abuse Might Have for NOT Telling Their Story by Wade Mullen (Thanks to my sister and brother-in-law for sharing this link.)


(5) of my favorite books on the subject of vocation / work / calling

  1. Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation by Parker J. Palmer

  2. Finding Livelihood: A Progress of Work and Leisure by Nancy J. Nordenson (Also: Check out Nancy’s Finding Livelihood playlist on Spotify!)

  3. Kingdom Calling: Vocational Stewardship for the Common Good by Amy L. Sherman

  4. The Stories We Live: Finding God’s Calling All Around Us by Kathleen A. Cahalan

  5. Work Songs: The Porter's Gate Worship Project Vol 1 (Not a book, but if one can "read" songs, this album is a gorgeous theological treatise on the goodness of work.)


(6) photos from this week



May your weekend include meaningful personal interactions, celebration, and rest. Peace...

p.s. This post may contain affiliate links because I'm trying to be a good steward, and when you buy something through one of these links you don't pay more money, but in some magical twist of capitalism we get a little pocket change. Thanks!

Advent Daybook, 13: When I was in a besieged city

My Advent daybook for these 24 days of waiting. Join me, won't you? (see previous Advent daybook 2017 posts here)

*Note: If you're reading this in email, the formatting usually looks much better at the website. Just click the post title to get there.*


Jerusalem and surrounding areas, screenshot from the music video by The Brilliance, "Yahweh"

Jerusalem and surrounding areas, screenshot from the music video by The Brilliance, "Yahweh"


music for today: "Yahweh", The Brilliance  (lyrics)

Spotify | YouTube


In the second year of Darius the king, in the sixth month, on the first day of the month, the word of the Lord came by the hand of Haggai the prophet to Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and to Joshua the son of Jehozadak, the high priest: “Thus says the Lord of hosts: These people say the time has not yet come to rebuild the house of the Lord.” Then the word of the Lord came by the hand of Haggai the prophet, “Is it a time for you yourselves to dwell in your paneled houses, while this house lies in ruins? Now, therefore, thus says the Lord of hosts: Consider your ways. You have sown much, and harvested little. You eat, but you never have enough; you drink, but you never have your fill. You clothe yourselves, but no one is warm. And he who earns wages does so to put them into a bag with holes.

“Thus says the Lord of hosts: Consider your ways. Go up to the hills and bring wood and build the house, that I may take pleasure in it and that I may be glorified, says the Lord. You looked for much, and behold, it came to little. And when you brought it home, I blew it away. Why? declares the Lord of hosts. Because of my house that lies in ruins, while each of you busies himself with his own house. Therefore the heavens above you have withheld the dew, and the earth has withheld its produce. And I have called for a drought on the land and the hills, on the grain, the new wine, the oil, on what the ground brings forth, on man and beast, and on all their labors.”

—-

”Oh, how abundant is your goodness, which you have stored up for those who fear you and worked for those who take refuge in you, in the sight of the children of mankind! In the cover of your presence you hide them from the plots of men; you store them in your shelter from the strife of tongues.

Blessed be the Lord, for he has wondrously shown his steadfast love to me when I was in a besieged city. I had said in my alarm, “I am cut off from your sight.” But you heard the voice of my pleas for mercy when I cried to you for help.

Love the Lord, all you his saints! The Lord preserves the faithful but abundantly repays the one who acts in pride. Be strong, and let your heart take courage, all you who wait for the Lord!

—-

”‘He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches.’”

—-

“ ‘O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! See, your house is left to you desolate. For I tell you, you will not see me again, until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.’
— Haggai 1:1-12, Psalm 31:19-24, Revelation 2:29, Matthew 23:37-39 (ESV)

* Sunday Scripture readings are taken from the Revised Common Lectionary (Year B). Daily Scripture readings are taken from the Book of Common Prayer (Year 2).


prayer for today:

With all our heart and with all our mind, let us pray to the Lord, saying “Lord, have mercy.”

For the peace from above, for the loving-kindness of God, and for the salvation of our souls, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For the peace of the world, for the welfare of the Holy Church of God, and for the unity of all peoples, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For our spiritual leaders, and for all the clergy and people of congregations, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For our President, for the leaders of the nations, and for all in authority, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For this city (town, village, _______ ), for every city and community, and for those who live in them, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For seasonable weather, and for an abundance of the fruits of the earth, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For the good earth which God has given us, and for the wisdom and will to conserve it, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For those who travel on land, on water, or in the air, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For the aged and infirm, for the widowed and orphans, and for the sick and the suffering, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For ______________ , let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For the poor and the oppressed, for the unemployed and the destitute, for prisoners and captives, and for all who remember and care for them, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For all who have died in the hope of the resurrection, and for the lives of all the departed, we give you thanks, oh Lord. May we follow in the footsteps of the faithful.

Lord, have mercy

For deliverance from all danger, violence, oppression, and degradation, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

For the absolution and remission of our sins and offenses, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

That we may end our lives in faith and hope, without
suffering and without reproach, let us pray to the Lord.

Lord, have mercy.

Defend us, deliver us, and in thy compassion protect us, O Lord, by thy grace.

Lord, have mercy.

In the communion of all the saints, let us commend ourselves, and one another, and all our life, to Christ our God.

To thee, O Lord our God.

Silence.
— Prayers of the People (Form 1), Book of Common Prayer

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Make a simple loaf of bread to share with a neighbor, co-worker, or someone in your community you want to show appreciation. Don't worry about being fancy. A loaf of bread in itself is deeply meaningful. If you're not able to make your own, pick up a fresh loaf from a local bakery. 

Here's a recipe if you need one: Easy Cinnamon Bread


(see all Advent daybook posts from 2016 here)